Tag Archives: Julian Fellowes

Downton Abbey Season 4, ep. 2 recap

Mary & Anthony

At the end of last night’s episode of Downton Abbey, I honestly didn’t know how I was going to approach today’s recap.  Episode 2 depicted a brutal act of violence on one of the most beloved characters, making all other plot lines seem insignificant and petty by comparison.  It was a jarring note that was sharply out of tune with what Downton Abbey fans expect from the show each week.  Yes, we were dealt some emotional blows last season with the loss of two major characters, but there was something about this plot twist that seemed so terribly out of place with the rest of the series.

That being said, I will still recap the episode, leaving my personal thoughts on “that BIG thing that happened” for the end.

Warning: Huge, major spoilers ahead!

This week’s episode begins with a house party at Downton, one that makes old-fashioned Robert remember the good ol’ days before the war.  The purpose of the party is to help cheer Mary up and continue to bring her back around into society.  Anthony “Tony” Foyle (Lord Gillingham), an old family friend, seems to have been invited solely for that purpose.  Even though he’s nearly engaged to a wealthy heiress, he doesn’t do much to hide his new-found fancy for Mary.

Mary & Anthony 2

This causes Mary to go into self-reflection mode, as she tells Anthony that Matthew changed her, and she wonders if she wouldn’t be stronger now if she had been the person she was before Matthew.  But later (after she sees Matthew’s old gramophone while dancing with Anthony), she tells Anna she doesn’t know if she is more in mourning for Matthew or for the person she was when she was with him.  Hopefully Mary will soon find her footing in her Matthew-less world.

Edith & Gregson

Michael Gregson is dragged out to Downton by Edith, who wants her father to get to know him better.  Gregson tries to catch Robert, but as we all know, he’s pretty good at the whole avoidance thing.  Robert is also in his usual “let’s throw money down the drain!” form and loses a tidy little sum to another house guest, Terence Sampson.  Gregson at last endears himself to Edith’s Papa when he uses some old tricks to outsmart Sampson the card sharp, and wins back all of Robert’s money.  So now that Robert likes Gregson, we can anticipate that Fellowes will likely place a new obstacle in Edith and Gregson’s way (besides the whole divorce thing).  Because happy endings just aren’t what he’s about these days.

The other house guest, Sir John Bullock, sets his cap at Rose, and we see them interact a bit, but to me it was mostly background noise as I was trying to keep up with everything else that was going on. (Plus Rose still isn’t my favorite….why the heck didn’t she ask Mary if it was okay to use Matthew’s old gramophone?  Typical teenager.)

Rose

Amidst all this, Tom is feeling like a white-tie-clad fish out of water.  The Dowager tries to help him fit in, but he’s bad at the small talk, he doesn’t know the proper way to address people, and frankly, he has nothing in common with them.  If Matthew had been around, I’m sure he would have kept Tom company and helped ease him into these sorts of situations (since they were once new to Matthew as well), but without him there, Tom’s adrift.  So, cue Edna!  What is this woman’s end game, exactly?  Does she actually like Tom?  Or does she just enjoy messing with his head?  I’m going with the latter.  At the end of the episode, she brings him a huge tumbler of whiskey, suggests he take it to bed with him, and then decides to join them.  Without asking.  Given the scene that took place right before this one, I couldn’t help but think there was some sort of horrible theme Fellowes was trying to inject into the episode.

The big upstairs event of the house party was the performance of opera singer Nellie Melba (portrayed by Dame Kiri Te Kanawa), who Lord Robert and Carson could not figure out where to place (given what happened at the end of the episode, doesn’t this seem so immaterial?).  She’s above a servant, but below a house guest.  Oh, what to do?  In the end Cora solves the problem for them by becoming furious at Robert and inviting Dame Melba down to dinner, where she and Robert bond over a shared love of claret.  Crisis averted.

Robert & Dame Melba

While Mary seems to be coming out of her mourning, Isobel is still mired with grief.  Penelope Wilton’s portrayal of the grieving mother was in top form this episode.  The dinner scene in which she sees Mary laughing was wonderfully done.  She knows it’s not fair to think Mary might grieve for her son forever, but at the same time Isobel is having trouble moving on.

Isobel

While everyone’s having a grand time remembering the good ol’ days upstairs, it’s frantic chaos downstairs to make sure the house party is pulled off successfully.  There are visiting valets and maids, though not as many as Carson would like to see (apparently he has yet to accept the newsflash that many aristocrats are feeling the post-war financial crunch), so that means some of the downstairs staff have to attend to the guests.  But no one is feeling the strain more than Mrs. Patmore, who has a panic attack  while preparing the big dinner and Alfred jumps in to make the sauces (yay, Alfred! For once your character had something else to do besides pining over Ivy!).

Mrs Patmore

But even with all the craziness happening downstairs (Jimmy sprains his wrist while twisting a jar to impress Ivy!  Oh, when will the hi-jinks end?), Lord Gillingham’s valet, Green, still finds time to strike up some friendly card games with the downstairs staff, and takes an instant interest in Anna, something Bates is none too happy about.  But Anna, being the kind, trusting creature that she is, thinks it’s completely harmless.  It turns out to be anything but.  While the entire Downton staff are upstairs attending the performance of Dame Melba, Anna goes downstairs for some headache powder.  There she is cornered by Green and subsequently beaten and raped.  No one is downstairs to hear her screams.  Mrs. Hughes later finds her, huddled shaking in a corner.  Anna begs Mrs. Hughes to keep what she’s seen a secret.  Anna fears that Bates will go after Green and land himself in jail once more.  She makes up a flimsy excuse to Bates, saying the bruises were a result of fainting and smacking her head against the sink as she went down.  She refuses to walk home with him, and goes out into the darkness, crying quietly.

I have no idea where this storyline is going, but Bates is bound to put two and two together and figure out what happened.  I will just be interested to see if he finds out from Anna, or if he figures it out himself.  But whatever happens, I have no doubt this event will put a great strain on Bates and Anna’s relationship.

For my part, Downton Abbey has always been a wonderful escape, and while I’m not saying rape is a subject that shouldn’t be discussed or to pretend it never happened in the past, the violent act just felt so out of character for the show.  Depending on how they move forward with this, I am concerned about Fellowes’s motives for doing this.  Was it just for shock value, or will it have a major, long-lasting (and seemingly devastating) effect on the character?  And will that effect be realistic and true to the period?  Of one thing I’m certain, Downton has taken a seriously dark turn, and there’s no going back now.

I had some other thoughts about last night’s episode, and I think that Edwardian Promenade covered them very well.  Here’s the link to the recap: http://www.edwardianpromenade.com/downton-abbey/downton-abbey-season-4-episode-2-recap-downtonpbs/

What did you think about the episode and the shocking turn of events?

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Downton Abbey Season 4, ep. 1 recap

Matthew's grave

Warning: Spoilers ahead for season 4, episode 1

After last season’s devastating finale, we’ve spent a year waiting to see how the characters of Downton Abbey would move forward without its leading man and heir, Matthew Crawley.  The season 4 premiere picks up 6 months after Matthew’s untimely demise, and at a crossroads for Mary.  As the wise Dowager Countess tells her, she must choose between either death or life.  And while she spends the first half of the episode in a grief-stricken fog, in the second half we see Mary rejoining the land of the living.  Welcome back, Mary, and welcome back, Downton Abbey!

I found the majority of last night’s premiere to be a delight.  The actors were in top form, the storylines (for the most part) engaging.  There was so much going on in last night’s episode, I’m going to mainly focus on the highlights.

Mary

Upstairs the house is divided over how Mary should handle her grief.  Wait, let me correct that: everyone but Robert thinks it’s time Mary move on and perhaps take an interest in something other than staring out the window and…well, just staring in general.  But Robert thinks she should go on wallowing in her grief, and in the meantime he’ll just reclaim the reins and run the estate.  After two really wonderful scenes between Mary and the Dowager and Mary and Carson (really, those two scenes stole the show for me), Mary finally comes around to the idea that it’s time to rebuild her life.  Good thing Mary thinks of Carson as a second father, because she certainly doesn’t receive much support from her dear Papa when she expresses an interest in running Downton.  We got emotional whiplash, watching Robert go from telling everyone to handle Mary with kid gloves to giving her a very public verbal smack down about how she doesn’t know anything about managing a farm.

Mary and Tom

But not to worry, because Branson, er, Tom, is ready to teach Mary Estate Running 101 (that’s, right: a former chauffeur/revolutionary teaching a lord’s daughter about farming).  Mary is somewhat doubtful (and rightfully so because of the aforementioned reasons) about whether or not she can do this.  But Matthew reaches from beyond the grave to instill some confidence in her with yet another convenient dead-character-letter, a plot device I think Fellowes should patent at this point (first there was Reggie Swire, then Lavinia, and I swear if Sybil hadn’t been suffering from eclampsyia she would have penned one too, though she had more time to talk to everyone about her wishes before she died, so I guess it wasn’t necessary).  While I was preparing for a good eye roll, the letter was actually kind of nice, contrived as it was.  Recall how, in season 1, Matthew really wasn’t pleased about inheriting Downton Abbey and Cora’s fortune along with it.  He thought its rightful heir was Mary.  So, in a nice “full circle” wrap-up, Matthew proclaims that Mary should be the sole heiress of his fortune, and that she must take charge.  Now, why he wrote the note and then stuck it in a random book in his office, I don’t know.  But look, he kept the good luck charm Mary gave him during the war!  Seeing that was the closest I came to tearing up during the episode.

Mary with stuffed dog

I’m excited to see how Mary rebuilds her life, and it sounds like the old Mary we knew from season 1 is returning, and she’s going to need that backbone if she wants to successfully take on her stubborn Papa.

Edith and Michael Gregson

Meanwhile, Edith frequently escapes to London to see her married editor, Michael Gregson.  Her transformation is obvious by the clothing choices she makes.  She’s become stylish and seems so full of life when she’s around Gregson (but then, compared to Mary, it doesn’t take much to accomplish this).  Gregson tells Edith he’s come up with a way for them to be together–he can get a divorce if he becomes a German citizen!  Great idea, Gregson!  I’m sure nothing can go wrong there.  Right?

Rose

And then we have Rose.  I knew she was going to get on my nerves, I just knew it.  I’m trying to like her, I really am.  But she’s that annoying added-in character whose only purpose seems to be to show us the youthful side of the “Roaring 20s.”  Her bedroom is a stark contrast to Mary’s, with the gramophone playing, the magazines spread out on the bed.  She’s a young, hip teenager!  She wants to party.  And so she does, roping Anna into going to a dance hall with her, where she proceeds to have two men get into a fist fight over her.  And in the one “headdesk” moment of the night for me, when the guy she danced with visits Downton to see her, she comes out in a maid’s outfit (since that was her alibi at the dance hall), to tell him that she is engaged to someone else…but she of course must kiss him before he goes.  Oh, Rose, you little rebel.

Rose

Speaking of Rose, apparently her mother decided that it was a fair trade to give Cora her annoying daughter in exchange for Cora’s lady’s maid we love to hate, O’Brien.  I’ll admit it, I wasn’t that sad to see her go (yeah, I said it).  Her plot line last year was so boring as she slowly set the trap for Thomas.  Longest. Revenge scheme. Ever.  But I didn’t really care for the treatment of her departure.  She just runs away, “like a thief in the night.”  What about the loyalty, O’Brien?  You weren’t willing to let anybody hurt her ladyship after the Great Soap Incident.  Seemed slightly out of character, though O’Brien was always looking out for herself.  And in her place, who should we have step into the role of Conniving Lady’s Maid 2.0 but Edna Braithwaite, the former housemaid who forced Branson, er, Tom, to tears during the season 3 finale by making him feel ashamed of who he had become.  Thomas already has his hooks in her, and actually schemes with her to frame Anna, ANNA!, of all people, for a blouse Edna ruined.  Seriously, Thomas?  You want to go after the nicest person downstairs, the one who is married to a man who was accused of murder and spent a year in jail?  You want to go there?  Okay, well…I guess we’ll find out how that works for you.

Edna

No Edna, you don’t look at all villainous grinning by the fire like that.

When Thomas isn’t manipulating Edna, he’s working his magic on Lady Cora regarding Nanny West.  Not liking the way the nanny treats him like a servant, Thomas gives a tip to her ladyship that Nanny West isn’t taking proper care of the children.  Turns out Thomas’s malign meddling is for the best, as we learn Nanny West is neglecting baby Sybbie because she is the daughter of the former chauffeur, going so far as to call her a “crossbreed”.  Cora catches her in the act and immediately dismisses her.  She’s grateful to Thomas for the information, gratitude I’m sure Thomas will find a way to work in his favor.

Cora catches Nanny West

Cora listening in on Nanny West

Elsewhere downstairs, we still have the most awkward love square ever happening.  Ivy loves Jimmy, Alfred loves Ivy, and Daisy loves Alfred.  And they all know it!  So Ivy, when Jimmy asks you to go to the pub and gets you squiffy, it’s because he’s bored and this is his idea of fun.  Not because he likes you.  Come on!  I’m still rooting for Daisy, though.  She got compliments from the Dowager for her electric mixer mousse!  She could really go places with that kind of endorsement!

Daisy

Also downstairs, Mr. Carson receives a letter from the second half of his Cheerful Charlies act, Charlie Grigg.  A man he has no desire to hear from, because, as we find out, he stole his love, Alice, away from him.  But Mrs. Hughes, being the benign meddler that she is, goes and visits him in the poor house.  Carson is furious and blusters about, but Mrs. Hughes, undeterred, goes to Isobel Crawley for assistance.  In the process, she helps pull Isobel from her grief by giving her a taste of the work she used to do and love.  Isobel takes in Mr. Grigg and helps him find a job and get back on his feet.  Before he leaves, Carson speaks with Charlie, who tells him Alice admitted later that she made a mistake, that she should have chosen Carson.  If she had, Carson’s entire life would have had a very different trajectory.  Downton without Carson?  I don’t want to think about that.

The Cheerful Charlies make amends

The Cheerful Charlies make amends

That leaves us with our happily married, contented, Mr. and Mrs. Bates.  Things are rosy in the garden for them for now (which worries me, because we know how Fellowes feels about happy couples…).  The two decide they want to help Mr. Molesley, who has not found another job since the death of his former employer.  Because Molesley refuses straight-up charity, Bates decides to put into practice some of his learned-in-jail skills, and forges Molesley’s name on a letter stating he had lent money to Bates.  Molesley gratefully accepts the “repayment,” and we are left to wonder what he’s going to do when it runs out.

Bates & Molesley

A befuddled Molesley accepts money from Bates

There was a lot to digest in episode 1, being a two-hour block.  And as usual, it served mainly to set up the character arcs for the season, which I am very excited to see play out.  Next week it looks like the Crawleys are hosting a party, Downton style.

What did you all think of episode 1?  Did it live up to your expectations, and was it worth the wait?

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Downton Abbey: Thoughts about Season 4

season 4 cast image

Warning: There are a few spoilers below for Downton Abbey seasons 1-3.

While the fourth season of Downton Abbey airs in the UK, we in the US must sit around twiddling our thumbs until January, attempting to avoid spoilers (well, some of us, anyway).  So far I’ve been successful, but I had a near miss this morning when Twitter started to discuss last week’s episode (I closed the window just in time).  No doubt I’ll eventually run into something, or my willpower will give out.  We’ll see which one comes first.

But until then, I’d like to share a little bit about what I hope to see (and what I’m concerned about) regarding season 4.

Here’s the trailer, for those of you who haven’t seen it yet:

Kissing, tears, dancing, and Dowager Countess wisdom–all the staples of the show are there.  There was a lot of positive buzz around the first episode, and it appears this season is going to focus on Lady Mary climbing out of her grief.  So here’s the big question for Downton Abbey: is there life after Dan/Matthew?

Lady Mary

And that leads me to one of the things I am really looking forward to this season.  Mary is one of the most dynamic characters on the show.  I want to see how she will move forward after the loss of Matthew, who was always such a huge part of her story.  I know Michelle Dockery will do a fantastic job, I just hope Julian Fellowes doesn’t do one of his classic “Let’s talk about this for one episode, and then bounce back and pretend like it never happened” moves.

Several new characters are coming on board this season who are being labeled as “Lady Mary’s suitors” and I just wonder if they can live up to the Matthew/Mary dynamic.  And how Mary will feel about them after the loss of her beloved husband.  And I can’t help but feel concerned for whoever she might choose, given the fate of all of her former love interests (Note: I still find it suspicious Richard Carlisle is never heard from again, and if any story about Mr. Pamuk made it in the papers, we certainly never heard about it…).

I truly loved Matthew and Mary together, but I do agree that “happily ever after” doesn’t drum up much drama, which leads me to…

season 4 anna and bates

What might be in store for Anna and Bates?  At the end of season 3 they were finally together, finally happy.  And given Mr. Fellowes’s philosophy on happy couples, I can only imagine what he has in store for them.  But judging from the trailer, it will involve some tears.  One guess is that Bates may not be as innocent as we think he is, or he may do something that shakes Anna’s steadfast faith in him.  Because otherwise those two are rock solid (unless Anna becomes pregnant, in which case she’s doomed, because that never marks a happy occasion at Downton).  Dare I say it?  I’d actually like to see a little shake up in their relationship this season, as long as it’s believable (again, I’m counting on you, Julian!).

branson

What about the other household member who lost a spouse last season?  I feel like Branson might be ready to move on, more so than Mary.  Maybe that’s because his entire relationship with Sybil revolved around her visiting him in the garage a few times, a botched elopement, and then some time in Ireland that we never saw.  Don’t get me wrong, their relationship was sweet and all, but they’re no Matthew & Mary.  But Branson himself is becoming a very intriguing character, caught between upstairs and down, unsure of what his social position is.  And now that one of his main allies is gone (Matthew), how will his relationship with the Crawleys fare?  Maybe Mary will step in to fill the gap left by her husband.

edith

I’m on the fence about what Edith’s story might be like this season, and whether or not I’m looking forward to it.  Sure, I want to see Edith come into her own at long last, and she deserves some happiness.  But I hope she doesn’t become some sort of walking cliche for the “working, independent girl” of the 1920s.  And speaking of cliches…

lily-james-as-lady-rose

This is the girl I’m really worried about.  Yes, Downton needs some new, young blood walking its halls.  But Rose got on my nerves in season 3, and I’m worried they’ll load her up with “flapper girl” cliches and make her a walking representation of a new decade.  But maybe I can forgive that if they give her character a little more substance.

daisy

I don’t even have any guesses as to what will happen downstairs this season.  From the trailer, it looks like we’ll have more love triangles going on, and some new faces.  What will it be like without O’Brien?  And who will replace her?  What evil business will Thomas get into, and who will be his new partner in crime?  His new buddy Jimmy, perhaps?  And will Daisy ever get her life sorted out?  Here’s hoping she doesn’t stalk around the kitchen with a perpetual scowl on her face this season.

What else?  I’m sure Robert will still walk around with his chest puffed up, spouting out bad advice, and Cora will quietly stand by his side.  I’m sure there’s some great Dowager quips to look forward to, and I’m excited to see Maggie Smith paired up with Harriet Walter (who played Fanny in the 1995 adaptation of Sense & Sensibility).  Let the sparring begin!

What are you looking forward to most about season 4 of Downton Abbey?  What are you most concerned about?  And are you trying to avoid spoilers, or do you feel they don’t impact your viewing enjoyment?

And as a reward for getting all the way through my rambling thoughts about Downton, click here to see the PBS preview of the first episode of season 4.

Photos copyright PBS and ITV.

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The Chronicles of Downton Abbey: A Review

Chronicles of Downton Abbey

This Christmas I received The Chronicles of Downton Abbey: A New Era, the latest Downton companion book by Jessica Fellowes, niece of series creator Julian Fellowes.  And I could not put it down.  It was the perfect way to gear up for the coming third season, which starts this Sunday (Jan. 6) on PBS.

I think I prefer Chronicles to Fellowes’s other companion book, The World of Downton Abbey.  Each chapter takes an in depth look at one (and sometimes two) of the main characters both upstairs and down.  Fellowes discusses events that have taken place in the characters’ lives and how they’ve shaped and changed their personalities over the course of the series.  Select quotes are scattered throughout to break up the narrative text, along with beautiful color photographs from the set.  The actors give their takes on what makes their characters tick, and Fellowes also tucks in tidbits from her research to help explain character motivations.  This was the part I found particularly insightful.  When you know more about the life of a ladies maid, it helps to round out the background of O’Brien.  We better understand the hardships Lady Sybil and Branson face when we can compare their situation to other couples of the time who married outside their social class.

In addition, costume designer Caroline McCall explains her vision for each character and how that came across in their wardrobe, and the end of each chapter has a page filled with material objects that would have been a part of the character’s daily life.

Fellowes does an excellent job of bringing the characters to life on the page.  And I also think the book helps to give the characters more dimension than they sometimes get on the screen by taking plenty of time to discuss their backstory, their hopes for the future, and the challenges they presently face.  The fictional characters are made more real when their lives are compared to their real life contemporaries.

I give The Chronicles of Downton Abbey five stars, a must-own for any Downton enthusiast.

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Downton Revisited

With Thanksgiving over, most people around here are counting down the days until Christmas.  But I’m counting down the days to Downton.  Okay, yeah, I’ll admit I’m looking forward to Christmas too.  But I have been eagerly anticipating Downton Abbey‘s return since season 2 ended.  I’ve been patient, and I haven’t looked up spoilers (well, I did come across one HUGE one, but I promise it was accidental, honest.  Blame it on Google).  And I hope my patience pays off.

I just finished re-watching the first season of the show and remembered why I fell in love with the series.  I’ll be the first to admit it is a guilty pleasure, a soap opera dressed up in period costume.  But the first season didn’t make that quite so apparent.  The scandals made more sense, and had major ramifications on the story line.  The second series was a little over the top at times (There was the whole “Matthew can’t walk, oh wait, he can!” thing.  And the scandal with maid Ethel and the soldier, then the scandal with the replacement maid and Lord Grantham.  And don’t forget forget (possibly) fake Patrick Crawley, who was in and out in one episode).  Did I still enjoy it?  Yes.  Did I buy the DVD?  Of course.  Am I going to watch it again to prepare for season 3? Absolutely.

BUT.  I do hope that season 3 will get back to the heart of what made season 1 so great.  Scandals?  Bring them on.  But make them a little more realistic, and a lot more important to the story arc of the series.

43 days until Downton and counting.  Don’t disappoint me, Julian Fellowes.

And for goodness sake, give Mary a reason to smile this season!

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Downton on DVD

I admit it, I’m going through Downton Abbey withdrawal and it hasn’t even been a full week since the last episode aired.  So I broke down and bought Season 2 on DVD.  I’m glad I did–just  like with Season 1, PBS cut out parts of the original UK edition.  I haven’t seen all of the episodes yet, but here are a few examples.  When Carson talks to Mrs. Hughes about becoming Lady Mary and Sir Richard’s butler, he tells a really cute story about Mary when she was a little girl.  The inclusion of this story made Mary’s cold response to Carson when he tells her he cannot go with her sting even more.  There’s also a scene when the ladies with the white feathers first arrive and give one to Branson, who cheekily informs them that he’s already in uniform (chauffeur’s uniform, of course).

There are also some excellent special features on the DVD: Fashion and Uniforms, Romance in a Time of War, and House to Hospital.  They reveal how makeup artists took the dirt from the filming location of the trench scenes in order to have the color match up with the makeup they used on the soldiers.  How Julian Fellowes felt that Lady Sybil would want to marry Branson not just because of love but because it “suits her rebellious nature.”  And why Michelle Dockery(Lady Mary) believes that if wealthy and powerful Sir Richard had shown up at the beginning of Season 1, there never would have been a “Matthew & Mary” relationship.  Oh, and you also get to hear Maggie Smith say “been there, done that, and got the t-shirt.”

So for those of you going through Downton withdrawal, do yourself a favor and buy the unedited UK edition of Season 2–certainly worth it in my opinion.

If you still need help overcoming your withdrawal symptoms, check out my post on The World of Downton Abbey by Jessica Fellowes, the companion book to the first two seasons of Downton Abbey.

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Downton Abbey returns

It’s been almost a year now since we were first introduced to the Crawley family and their servants who inhabit the sprawling British estate known as Downton Abbey.  It is one of the finest works of historical fiction created directly for the screen that I have seen in a very, very long time (no wonder it was just nominated for 4 Golden Globes, including best miniseries).

While the characters may be fictional (from the imagination of Julian Fellowes, screenwriter of Gosford Park), the Edwardian world in which they live is very accurately recreated.  From the organized chaos in the kitchen to the lavish dining room where the family and their guests adhere to rigid societal rules (and those who do not are subject to severe scrutiny), it is easy to lose yourself in their world.  But Fellowes has also managed to convey in his characters the kinds of human emotions that are timeless, and thus we can all relate to one character or another, even if they lived nearly a hundred years ago.

Now Downton Abbey is returning for a second season on PBS, and this time we will see the world as they know it fall apart with the onset of World War I.  This time period is one that I’ve always been drawn to, but more on that later.  If you have not seen the first season, PBS is giving you a chance to catch up starting this Sunday.  The new season begins on January 8.   I will be posting my thoughts on the episodes as they play out, and I’d love to hear your opinions too.  Until then, I will be anxiously counting down to Downton’s return.

Visit PBS’s Downton Abbey website.

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